mckayandgray:

Pretty Mouth Update! Page 143!
Start Reading! || Latest Page
RSS | Smack Jeeves | Facebook | Tapastic | Writer | Illustrator | T-Shirts
Buy Pretty Mouth: Volume One! Print or ebook available.
If you like the Pretty Mouth, please reblog, it’ll help people find our comic!

edit: Add bubbles
Ethan <3
(Ethan is Silver’s big brother if you didn’t know. He’s just a cameo honestly but he is the love of my life)

mckayandgray:

Pretty Mouth Update! Page 143!

Start Reading! || Latest Page

RSS | Smack Jeeves | Facebook | Tapastic | Writer | Illustrator | T-Shirts

Buy Pretty Mouth: Volume One! Print or ebook available.

If you like the Pretty Mouth, please reblog, it’ll help people find our comic!

edit: Add bubbles

Ethan <3

(Ethan is Silver’s big brother if you didn’t know. He’s just a cameo honestly but he is the love of my life)

thatsjustridiculous said: I followed after stumbling upon your webcomic reviews and advice on youtube. I liked listening to them, but when I searched for similar reviews (after exhausting yours) all I could find was misogynistic and discouraging drivel. Do you have any recommendations for other youtubers or even podcasts about webcomics, reviews, advice on the craft, etc? I enjoy listening to them while I work.

Yeah, I don’t really listen to any others personally.

I listen to The Webcomic Relief. He’s louder and more abrasive but he comes across as a nice guy and is fair to the comics he reviews and well researched. I mean he originally hated furies but was open-minded enough to explore the genre and found furry comics that he now loves. Anyway, blah, blah, blah, check him out for yourself.

Other than that I listen to Writing Excuses, it a podcast focused on writing. However one of the hosts is the writer/illustrator of Schlock Mercenary so there is a bit of a webcomic element on occasion. That and there are a few other episodes related to visual elements in writing I believe.

So yes! If anyone else has any be sure to give a shout out.

littlebastardreviews:

Admin Tip #012: How to Write an Effective Plot 
First of all, there really isn’t a right or wrong way to write a plot. What people should be looking to label the functionality of a plot is whether or not it gets a story across and if it draws people in. 
The thing with plot pages is that you want to entice people in towards becoming interested in it. But you can’t do that without providing the right sort of information. I usually advise to think along the idea of incorporating the basic “who, what, when, where and why/how”.
Who: You want to talk about who’s involved. You’ll need to get the reader to care about the main parties in your game. Whether it be the various species in a game, two feuding families, key figures to know in the history of a town—things of the sort. This is where you need to persuade people whether or not they should care about the main parties involved. Make sure you incorporate all parties involved, otherwise you may get an applicant or two completely unaware of a party that’s mentioned on a satellite page but not in the main article of plot. 
What: What’s going on in the game? What’s the fuel behind the action? Why are the above parties involved and why do the characters care about it? How does it affect their daily lives? This is important because it a; fuels the characters to care and b; if the characters care about something chances are the players will. It’s a chain reaction of getting multiple viewpoints in the line of spectator ship and whether or not they care. If the character doesn’t care, neither does the player. 
When/Where: The setting! We can’t have either of the above without a place to put it all. You want to make sure the time period and place comes across. Otherwise, you might get someone assuming it’s modern day when in fact it was set about 20 years ago. Make sure it’s clear. 
The above are categories are things you absolutely need to cover. The why and how however, is a little different. 
Why/How: For this subject I feel it should be a little something that is touched on but not completely covered. This should be something the reader is able to figure out on their own through the writing—which should be easy to figure out if you’ve successfully incorporated the above fields. You’ll want to touch on the why and how everything works, but you don’t want to completely give away the secrets of your big bad, so to speak. Leave a certain element of mystery to linger behind after we’ve finished reading. Imply things, leave hints, but don’t make the reasoning behind everything completely obvious and surface level. An author who writes a crime novel isn’t going to plainly tell who’s the big bad on the back of his book, and neither should you. 
And of course a few other tips to keep in mind. 
Avoid making the plot page a biography. This is not a good way to introduce your potential players to what’s going on in your game. Have a separate page for persons of importance, but the plot page should focus on the plot and not the person(s) involved in say, the foundation of a school. 
Choose a medium of storytelling that best fits your game. There are a variety of ways to tell a story. Let’s think of a few real world examples: a newspaper entry, a person’s journal entry or a travel brochure. 
A newspaper entry can get straight to the action. If your roleplay is strongly revolving around a certain event, this might be for you. Here is an example of one. 
A personal journal entry can do something of the same, but the content can be more raw and have more of a voice behind it. Does your game involve a reporter that disappeared? What about a refugee on the run? What about someone who is completely alone and the paper itself is the only thing they can tell their story to? 
A travel brochure can be an effective way to get setting driven plots across—and also a very nice way to set a subtly creepy tone across if you’re dealing with a horror or town plot with something dark going on. This can work very well, especially if you’ve got a very suburban, Burton-esque sort of town a la Edward Scissorhands where everything is too perfect. 
Obviously, you’re not limited to the ideas I’ve mentioned above. There are a variety of ways to tell a story. One can do so through interview transcripts, criminal or witness statements, transcripts from a court hearing—anything. There are multiple ways to go about writing a plot, but the standard summary of what’s going on isn’t the only way you have to do it as long as you’re getting the information across. Think outside the box and use a medium that suits your plot to your advantage. 
—James. 
The content above is further developed from this ask. 

littlebastardreviews:

Admin Tip #012: How to Write an Effective Plot 

First of all, there really isn’t a right or wrong way to write a plot. What people should be looking to label the functionality of a plot is whether or not it gets a story across and if it draws people in. 

The thing with plot pages is that you want to entice people in towards becoming interested in it. But you can’t do that without providing the right sort of information. I usually advise to think along the idea of incorporating the basic “who, what, when, where and why/how”.

  • Who: You want to talk about who’s involved. You’ll need to get the reader to care about the main parties in your game. Whether it be the various species in a game, two feuding families, key figures to know in the history of a town—things of the sort. This is where you need to persuade people whether or not they should care about the main parties involved. Make sure you incorporate all parties involved, otherwise you may get an applicant or two completely unaware of a party that’s mentioned on a satellite page but not in the main article of plot. 
  • What: What’s going on in the game? What’s the fuel behind the action? Why are the above parties involved and why do the characters care about it? How does it affect their daily lives? This is important because it a; fuels the characters to care and b; if the characters care about something chances are the players will. It’s a chain reaction of getting multiple viewpoints in the line of spectator ship and whether or not they care. If the character doesn’t care, neither does the player. 
  • When/Where: The setting! We can’t have either of the above without a place to put it all. You want to make sure the time period and place comes across. Otherwise, you might get someone assuming it’s modern day when in fact it was set about 20 years ago. Make sure it’s clear. 

The above are categories are things you absolutely need to cover. The why and how however, is a little different. 

  • Why/How: For this subject I feel it should be a little something that is touched on but not completely covered. This should be something the reader is able to figure out on their own through the writing—which should be easy to figure out if you’ve successfully incorporated the above fields. You’ll want to touch on the why and how everything works, but you don’t want to completely give away the secrets of your big bad, so to speak. Leave a certain element of mystery to linger behind after we’ve finished reading. Imply things, leave hints, but don’t make the reasoning behind everything completely obvious and surface level. An author who writes a crime novel isn’t going to plainly tell who’s the big bad on the back of his book, and neither should you. 

And of course a few other tips to keep in mind. 

  • Avoid making the plot page a biography. This is not a good way to introduce your potential players to what’s going on in your game. Have a separate page for persons of importance, but the plot page should focus on the plot and not the person(s) involved in say, the foundation of a school. 
  • Choose a medium of storytelling that best fits your game. There are a variety of ways to tell a story. Let’s think of a few real world examples: a newspaper entry, a person’s journal entry or a travel brochure. 
  • A newspaper entry can get straight to the action. If your roleplay is strongly revolving around a certain event, this might be for you. Here is an example of one. 
  • A personal journal entry can do something of the same, but the content can be more raw and have more of a voice behind it. Does your game involve a reporter that disappeared? What about a refugee on the run? What about someone who is completely alone and the paper itself is the only thing they can tell their story to? 
  • A travel brochure can be an effective way to get setting driven plots across—and also a very nice way to set a subtly creepy tone across if you’re dealing with a horror or town plot with something dark going on. This can work very well, especially if you’ve got a very suburban, Burton-esque sort of town a la Edward Scissorhands where everything is too perfect. 

Obviously, you’re not limited to the ideas I’ve mentioned above. There are a variety of ways to tell a story. One can do so through interview transcripts, criminal or witness statements, transcripts from a court hearing—anything. There are multiple ways to go about writing a plot, but the standard summary of what’s going on isn’t the only way you have to do it as long as you’re getting the information across. Think outside the box and use a medium that suits your plot to your advantage. 

—James. 

The content above is further developed from this ask

Tags: reference

flunflun said: Just wanted to say that I think you are the best web comic reviewer I've ever listened to! (Sorry to say I haven't really listened/read that many other web comic reviews so I don't know if I can compare you to that many others. Though I can't imagine someone being better??? Haha.) Really, keep up the good work! They're really interesting to listen to because I can see you really love web comics.

Thank you! :) I really want to take more time to work on my reviews. They’re a lot of fun and I’m glad people like them. I’ve got a few on the go though.

amandaonwriting:

The Locked Room – A simple way to test your plot

A trapped character comes alive on the page or screen because he has to fight his way out a corner. The character has to push back against the predicament placed there by the plot—giving us conflict, intensity, and barriers we can define. The locked room is a way to interrogate your plot. 

More about The Locked Room

Tags: reference

Just finished playing Little Inferno. It was a crazy good game with a fascinating world and gosh darn clear, solid, message portrayed through it’s game play and story. Seriously though if you haven’t played it you should do it up it takes about an hour.

I know nothing about commenting on video games. But seriously it’s ten bucks and you get to burn things.

;D

pumpkinpasties:

Community creator Dan Harmon’s Plot Embryo

  • character is in his/her comfort zone
  • but wants something
  • finds him/herself in an unfamiliar situation
  • that forces him/her to adapt
  • character gets what he/she wanted
  • but pays a heavy price
  • character returns to the familiar/the comfort zone
  • having changed

Tags: reference

Resources: Medieval Torture & Psychological Torture

writing-questions-answered:

Tags: reference

Anonymous said: Really nice meeting you at Fanexpo!!

;D You too anon!